Wavy Alabaster

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Slow Fashion Season 2.0

Slow Fashion Season 2.0

Last year I participated in Slow Fashion Summer, a grassroots campaign facilitated by CollAction, asking individuals to band together and refrain from purchasing new clothes from June 21st until September 21st. Friends joined me; and with 2625 other people from around the world, we rediscovered our closets and shopped secondhand and vintage. This year, we are aiming higher.

Slow Fashion Summer has morphed into Slow Fashion Season to reflect its global reach. We hope 10,000 people will join the challenge. If this number is achieved, up to 360 million liters of water will be saved and 1.4 million kilograms of CO2 will be prevented from entering the environment. According to The Biggest Fake News in Fashion by Vanessa Friedman, The New York Times's fashion director and chief fashion critic, “nearly three-fifths of all clothing ends up in incinerators or landfills within a year of being produced, more than eight percent of global greenhouse-gas emissions are produced by the apparel and footwear industries, and around 20 to 25 percent of globally produced chemical compounds are utilized in the textile-finishing industry.” If you have struggled with the fashion industry’s impact on the environment and want to help work toward a more sustainable narrative around style and fashion, this challenge is a great place to start.

vintage dress from  Dead Byrd Vintage  & vintage blazer gifted from Niki of  dirtyflaws

vintage dress from Dead Byrd Vintage & vintage blazer gifted from Niki of dirtyflaws

3 months. 10,000 people. No new clothes. #SlowFashionSeason

Pledging to not purchase any new clothes for three months is difficult. I know it is. Last year I was pregnant with Louise. Searching for sustainable clothing for my growing body required additional time and energy (and my energy was already in short supply). I wasn’t perfect. Hitting seven months pregnant, my mother bought me three maternity tank tops from Target. I would be lying if I said I didn’t need them. Though I did not buy anything else new, Slow Fashion Season, for me, morphed into something greater than how I purchased my clothes. It became a mindset.

vintage door knocker earrings from  ruhling // woven .

vintage door knocker earrings from ruhling // woven.

How I manage and create my wardrobe is increasing being influenced by sustainable principles. I make it a point to touch base with my closet once a month to rediscover pieces lost among the hangers. I am more thoughtful about what enters my closet. This has fueled my desire to pass along the items I no longer feel a connection to. Moving on from clothing can, in fact, produce the same high as acquiring them. My husband’s closet is now a shared space giving me access to an entirely new wardrobe (Ben’s button downs are great nursing tops). I am more content with repeating outfits, even if those outfits are documented in the social media stratosphere. My appreciation for clothes as a means of creative expression has not diminished through this process, but actually the opposite, it has deepened.

Louise assisting the shoot! She is wearing thrifted overalls and a floral onesie from  Kid to Kid Pittsburgh

Louise assisting the shoot! She is wearing thrifted overalls and a floral onesie from Kid to Kid Pittsburgh

I hope you join us and give it the ol’ college try. It is not an easy challenge, but I can promise you, at the end of the three months, it is a rewarding one. And, if you are in the Pittsburgh area, keep an eye out. I hope to bring us together to celebrate our effort.

Cheers, Jessa

3 months. 10,000 people. No new clothes. #SlowFashionSeason

Pledge Here & Follow along @SlowFashionSeason

Outfit Details:
vintage dress from Dead Byrd Vintage
vintage blazer gifted from Niki of dirtyflaws
secondhand Adidas sneakers gifted from my friend, Kendall
Door Knocker earrings from ruhling // woven

Photos by the lovely Rose Colored Creative

TRYP Pittsburgh | Lawrenceville: An Art Hotel to Call Home

TRYP Pittsburgh | Lawrenceville: An Art Hotel to Call Home